Electoral Tie
When there is a tie in the Electoral College, the election is thrown into Congress, with the House picking the President and the Senate choosing the Vice President.  In the House, each state is given one vote, an even further deviation from the principle of one person one vote.  Furthermore, the whole setup provides the chance for a President and Vice President to be selected from different parties. 

If by chance no Vice Presidential candidate manages to obtain a majority in the Senate, there exists no provision in the Constitution providing an explanation of the procedure to follow.  There is also no provision that addresses the possibility of Senators or Representatives running for President or Vice President voting for themselves.

Favorite Son Effect

A Few States Wins

Constitutional Residence

State Size

Special Interests

Power of State Legislatures

Unlucky Luck

Ignoring Your Vote

More Options

Vague Values

Electoral Replacements

Electoral College Table of Contents

December 21st 2008
Choose President by National Popular Vote
Wichita Eagle

Co-President of Wichita-Metro League of Women Voters cites FairVote in argument for National Popular Vote

December 17th 2008
Electoral College debate reignites
Small Newspaper Group (Illinois)

The debate over the Electoral College reignites in the land of Lincoln.

December 16th 2008
Flunking Electoral College
Baltimore Sun

Editorial making the case against the electoral college.

December 15th 2008
Garrett J. Bradley and Pamela H. Wilmot: In the most important election, all votes should matter
Enterprise News

Massachusetts State Rep and Common Cause director make the case against the electoral college.

December 15th 2008
Group Works To Weaken Electoral College Process

National Public Radio's 'All Things Considered,' -- News story featuring comments from FairVote's Rob Richie.

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